Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Seeing connections

The book of James has been described as a "string of pearls" for containing so many disjointed little gems of biblical wisdom. But Craig Keener writes about how the book of James fits together. And in case you missed it, Dr. Keener's post on the unifying theme of Romans is even better.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Expository example

David Allen offers a short but detailed study on how to outline and preach 1 John 2:15-17 in two blog posts: Part 1 & Part 2.

Understanding Mormonism

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Burdens in discipleship

Jeff Weddle shares a few biblical thoughts on burdens.

The need to preach on body image

Darryl Dash shares a link at Christianity Today on the importance of preaching about body image.

Monday, July 21, 2014

A taste for the Word

Preacher, do you approach Bible study like a starving chef?

Wisdom in discipleship

Jonathan Leeman offers some sound advice on when you should not submit to a church.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Knowing when to let your hair down

Craig Keener's blog insights on biblical texts are always insightful. His latest is on Proverbs 23:7.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

On spiritual experiences

Doug Floyd shares some of his personal struggles in the ongoing transformation into the image of Jesus Christ. Doug also offers a few thoughts on spiritual direction.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Conceived in sin

Here's one of the most fascinating, short articles I've read in a while: Jeff Weddle's interpretation of Ps. 51:5.

Christ or me?

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

On PPSD

Yes, it realliy does exist: Post-Preaching Stress Disorder.

Grace and truth

Parse has a valuable article this week on codependency and true service.

Monday, July 14, 2014

Excellent Romans overview

NT scholar Craig Keener has written the best brief overview of Romans I've ever seen. I shows the unity and cohesiveness of each of the letter's parts and makes the whole work easier to understand.

Friday, July 11, 2014

No creed but the Bible?

Scot McKnight, considering a recent book by Carl Trueman, asks if the Bible is really the only creed for Christians (HT). I don't agree with all the conclusions either man makes, but I'm pretty sure of this: the church ignores or grazes over the question at our peril.

Thursday, July 10, 2014

So much change, so little time

Much of what Roger Olson's observations on how American Evangelical Christianity has changed in his lifetime is relevant for many non-evangelicals as well (HT).

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Awake at the wheel?

Jeff Weddle looks at the NT"s three calls to wake up and draws some conclusions:
Life isn’t that exciting; it’s mostly just humdrum routine. It gets old. Nothing exciting to rally the troops. 
That’s why lots of Christians obsess over the news and do boycotts and post weird things on Facebook to engender outrage, or at the least emotion of some sort. 
It’s easier to spur emotions like hatred and anger than it is to stir up love and compassion.
Yep. Or a hunger and thirst for righteousness.

Strong links

Darryl Dash's latest collection of weekly links is worth a look.

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Shiny!

Christian, would you name your son Lucifer? Some early Christians did (NB: their sons, not yours).

Monday, July 07, 2014

Moral revolution at warp speed

In an essay at 9Marks, Albert Mohler really nails the current moral climate in the United States with this opening:
Western society is currently experiencing what can only be described as a moral revolution. Our society’s moral code and collective ethical evaluation on a particular issue has undergone not small adjustments but a complete reversal. That which was once condemned is now celebrated, and the refusal to celebrate is now condemned.

What makes the current moral and sexual revolution so different from previous moral revolutions is that it is taking place at an utterly unprecedented velocity. Previous generations experienced moral revolutions over decades, even centuries. This current revolution is happening at warp speed.
That's sad but true, and well stated. And the rest of Dr. Mohler's essay is equally as strong.